Sawatdee Khrap! Dechsakda Sitsongpeenong talks training, family, and Lion Fight 29

Dechsakda Sitsongpeenong Talks Fight Against Ognjen Topic Lion Fight 29

DechsakdaThis is Dechsakda from the well known Muay Thai camp Sitsongpeenong.

Standing at 5’7” (171 cm) and walking at 138 lbs (62.5 kg), Dechsakda is a pretty small guy! But there’s a saying of how you can’t judge a book by its cover, and this very well applies to him as well.

Small but extremely powerful, he easily overpowers bigger people in the clinch and has a very explosive and unpredictable style. And with clinching partners like Sitthichai and Yodpayak, this is no small feat.

With no shortage of a sense of humor, he is usually seen laughing and joking with his teammates and foreigner guests. Despite his positive spirit, Dechsakda’s story for a chance at glory and a better future is one that resonates with many fighters from Thailand.

Born and raised in the Isan province called Ubon Ratchathani, he forwent an education to pursue a career in fighting at a young age in order to make money for his family. Nearly 100 fights later, he gets the golden opportunity to fight on international soil, an opportunity many Thai fighters can only dream about.

Facing Ognjen Topic in Lion Fight on May 27th, Dechsakda shares his thoughts on his opponent and his excitement fighting in the United States.

An Interview With Dechsakda Sitsongpeenong

Angela Chang (AC): Hello Dechsakda! How are you today?

Dechsakda (D): Good, thanks.

AC: Much of the world doesn’t know your name yet – tell us a few random facts about yourself

D: I am from Ubon Ratchathani. I started fighting since I was 12 years old. Now I’m 22. I had about 30 fights in the countryside where I come from before I moved to join Sitsongpeenong when I was 15.

AC: How long have you been at Sitsongpeenong?

D: 7 years

Dechsakda pictured here clinching with fellow Lion Fight Muay Thai fighter Gaston Bolanos

AC: So you’re going to the U.S. to fight later this month on Lion Fight. How do you feel about that?

D: I’m excited and happy! I’ve never traveled so far before. I’ve only fought outside of Thailand once and it was in Japan. America is far.

AC: What does your training regimen look like and what aspect of it do you think contributes most to your success as a fighter?

D: I train about 3 hours in the morning, which includes a 15 km (almost 10 miles) run. The run is an hour and a half, and training is for another hour and a half. Afternoon we do about 2.5 hours. One of the benefits from training so hard is I’m in good physical condition. I’m a strong fighter, and that enables me to fight the style I like to fight, which is with knees and punches, which are my strengths.

AC: How else would you describe your fighting style?

D: I’m a fighter, aggressive and I go forward. I also like leg kicks.

AC: Tell us about your experiences fighting at Lumpinee and becoming a champion – was it a big deal for you, or was it like any other fight?

D: I’ve had 30 to 40 fights at Lumpinee Stadium. I started fighting at about 44 kg and rose up through all the weights, through the ranks to the top, which took about 5 years. Of course (the championship fight) was a very special fight for me because I went up another level and increased my credentials as a fighter and (it) brought more opportunities for me. Actually the (championship) fight wasn’t in Thailand; it was for the Lumpinee title but it was against a Japanese guy in Japan. I didn’t got a chance to defend it because I had to do military service, so I had to give up the title. I never got an opportunity to reclaim it.

AC: What goes through your mind before you fight?

D: I try to concentrate on my opponent and my opponent’s strengths and weaknesses, and their fighting style, in order to come up with a game plan to win against that him.

AC: What advantages do you think you have over Ongjen Topic?

Dechsakda: The biggest advantage I have is that I have a lot more fights and more experience. And I’ve faced many more fighters of different styles because I’ve had 3-4 times more fights. It’s a major advantage.

AC: Are there any other advantages you think you might have?

Dechsakda: I have probably gotten more complete as a fighter with all the weapons of Muay Thai. I am overall better with all the techniques, and my strength and conditioning is probably better although I’m a smaller fighter.

AC: What opportunities do you hope this bout on Lion Fight will bring you in the future?

Dechsakda: I will probably become more recognized outside of Thailand, and (it will) open up some more opportunities for me to have fights abroad.

AC: What in your life keeps your motivated to keep training and fighting?

Dechsakda: I want to become more successful and win more championships. And also for my family – I’m married and have a young son. It’s for their benefit as well, and for my parents. I want to be more successful, make more money, and take care of my family.

AC: Is there anything you want to say to the Muay Thai community, specifically outside of Thailand?

Dechsakda: Although you may not know me overseas, I’d like you to get behind me and support me, so (it can help me) get the confidence to fight.

AC: Lastly, who is your favorite fighter of all time?

Dechsakda: Kem, because he’s a good role model. He trains hard and takes care of himself, and he’s responsible.

Dechsakda’s Profile:

Fight Record: 98 Fights – 67 Wins – 27 Losses – 4 Draws

Titles: Former Lumpinee Stadium Super Bantamweight Champion (122lbs)

Current Ranking:

  • 1 – Lumpinee Stadium at Featherweight (126lbs), Mar 2016
  • 1 – Rajadamnern Stadium at Featherweight (126lbs), Mar 2016
  • 1 – Thailand (PAT) at Featherweight (126lbs), Mar 2016
  • 1 – WBC Muaythai at Featherweight (126lbs), Apr 2016

Dejsakda Vs PheWanchana

Special thank you to Timothy Dharmajiva for translating, and Rachida Naceur for allowing me to borrow some photos

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